Mailbox Monday

Welcome to Mailbox Monday. To check out everyone’s additions and add you own link, head to the Mailbox Monday Blog. I received a couple of books this week that I’m looking forward to reading.

Print:

Untimely Death came from Kaye Publicity. How could I pass up the combo of a resort and Shakespeare?

Mailbox Monday – 10/12 Untimely Death by Elizabeth J. Duncan
Series: Shakespeare in the Catskills Mystery #1
Published by Crooked Lane Books on November 10th 2015
Genres: Mystery
Pages: 304
Format: Hardcover
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A Catskills resort’s production of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet takes a wickedly ironic turn when the leading lady, Lauren Richmond, is first poisoned and then stabbed. Who would extinguish the life of such a beautiful young thespian? Who wouldn’t? Seems like just about everyone had a motive to pull the ropes on her final curtain call.

At the center of this Shakespearian tragedy is Charlotte Fairfax, formerly the costume mistress of the Royal Shakespeare Company. Upstate New York is a long way from the royal stage, but Charlotte is always the queen of her domain. As this small production’s costume designer, she has stitched her way into everyone’s lives, learning more than anyone could possibly imagine about the rise and fall of Lauren Richmond. But curiosity killed the cat. And it might well kill the costume designer.

I purchased Morning in the Burned House for two reasons. First, Louise Penny mentioned it when we saw her in August. Second, I can get Margaret Atwood to sign it when we go see her speak later this month. I’m also thinking it’ll be a good read for the Read-a-thon this Saturday.

Mailbox Monday – 10/12 Morning in the Burned House by Margaret Atwood
Published by Mariner Books on September 16th 1996
Genres: Poetry
Pages: 144
Format: Paperback
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These beautifully crafted poems - by turns dark, playful, intensely moving, tender, and intimate - make up Margaret Atwood's most accomplished and versatile gathering to date, " setting foot on the middle ground / between body and word." Some draw on history, some on myth, both classical and popular. Others, more personal, concern themselves with love, with the fragility of the natural world, and with death, especially in the elegiac series of meditations on the death of a parent. But they also inhabit a contemporary landscape haunted by images of the past. Generous, searing, compassionate, and disturbing, this poetry rises out of human experience to seek a level between luminous memory and the realities of the everyday, between the capacity to inflict and the strength to forgive.

What books found their way to your house?