Night Film by Marisha Pessl

I really enjoyed Night Film and I have to say that it kept my attention all the way through, which at over 23 hours is pretty impressive. McGrath was not my favorite of the characters. I didn't exactly understand his obsession, but I did like the two young adults who are his side-kicks. Their reasons for caring made more sense to me. He just let a story overtake him, their concerns are more personal. It's a long books and tends toward sprawling in places. It meanders and we follow trail after trail that (maybe) go nowhere. It's not a novel with answers, just more questions. And that's even before McGrath (maybe) loses touch with reality a bit. I have to say I really liked the whole set-up and the way reality mirrored fiction portraying reality - maybe.  I guess it's one of those stories where I just went along for the ride, let Pessl lead me down the alleys she wanted to. I loved her...
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Macbeth: The Graphic Novel adapted by John McDonald, written by William Shakespeare

When I read Light Thickens by Ngaio Marsh earlier this year, it made me want to re-read Shakespeare's Macbeth. Amber has had this graphic novel for a while and she enjoyed it, so I though it might be an interesting format to read the play. The dialogue is all the original, but the format obviously makes it feel different from reading the straight play. Macbeth is a great play and this is not a review of it. It's got witches and ghosts and murder and betrayal. It's really a fun tragedy, which is part of the reason I encouraged Amber to read it. She's not one to be afraid of classics, but Shakespeare's language can be daunting for anyone. The graphic novel makes it more accessible, you can see what's going on in addition to reading the dialogue. The illustrations are clean and colorful but not outstanding. I don't read many graphic novels, so take it for what it's worth, but the...
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The Corsican Caper by Peter Mayle

Ah, the lives of the rich. Wine and food and wonderful scenery. And a house so marvelous someone is willing to kill you for it. That's about all there is to this mystery. I was never really worried about Reboul, since Sam is clearly too smart to let anything happen to his friend. There's no real question who the bad guy is, but for someone as connected and careful as Vronsky is, his plan is foiled easily. It's a short audiobook and the narrator does an okay job with all the characters and accents, from French to Russian to American to whatever Elena is, but my mind kept wandering. There was a lack of tension, no need for clues. The food sounded delicious, but aside from that there isn't much else to keep my attention. The characters are two-dimensional. The mystery is pretty much non-existent and the solution to the problem is too easy. I started to say it's okay if you just need something...
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The Shell Game by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg

Short stories are always tough to talk about - I want people to know why I did/didn't enjoy it, but I don't want to give away too much. It's even tougher when it's a prequel to a series that I've read all the rest of, like this one. The Shell Game details Nick Fox and Kate O'Hare's first meeting. Nick's a con-man/thief and Kate's FBI. HE's charming, she's dedicated. They're both intelligent and good-looking, although I'm not sure you get a feel for how attracted they are to each other in this mini-episode. Nick gets to show off his cleverness, Kate gets to show off her ability to see through him, but I missed their interactions with each other that are so much of the fun in the series. Scott Brick does a good job as always as the narrator. His tone of voice fits the story, not melodramatic, but not straight either. Does that make sense. He knows the type of story...
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The Ice Queen by Nele Neuhaus

First off, a minor complaint. Neuhaus' series is being translated from German, but out of order. So the first I read was Snow White Must Die #4, then Bad Wolf #6, and now The Ice Queen#3. Each is a self-contained mystery, but Pia and Oliver's personal lives come into play a fair amount and it's a little odd going back in time to see where their relationships were, knowing how they change over time. It doesn't bother me too much, but I feel like it would be a stronger series read in order. The story is absorbing, a mystery involving an influential family and secrets that go back to WW2. The blurb above gives the basic plotline, but it gives you no idea of how inter-connected theses people's lives are, how horrible their secrets are. It's a large cast, and the narrator, Robert Fass, does a reasonable job. I found a few of his voices jarring, but I do understand that it can...
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Good Health, Good Life by Joyce Meyer

I don't know what I was expecting from this small book, but it was certainly more than I got. The twelve keys are good and solid: 1. Get God's Help 2. Learn to Love Your Body 3. Master Your Metabolism 4. Exercise 5. Eat in Balanced Ways 6. Water Your Life 7. Be Mindful About Eating 8. Curb Your Spiritual Hunger 9. De-Stress 10. Live With The Right Vision 11. Make It Easy 12. Take Responsibility But they're nothing new. Eat well, exercise, drink water. Don't let stress take over your life. The only thing that really distinguishes it from  other self-help books is that it comes at it from a Christian point of view. Our body is God's, so we should take care of it, both for its own sake and so that we are capable of doing the work He has for us. But that's not a new concept either, if you are a Christian - and if you're not I doubt you would pick up this book. The only good thing...
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