The Automaton’s Wife by Vered Ehsani

The Automaton’s Wife by Vered Ehsani

The Automaton's Wife is an amusing, quick read, although I do suggest reading the first in the series before this one. Bee continues her adventures in Africa with the help and also complications of her friends and family. This time around she meets a large bat, her husband's ghost has seemingly disappeared and her horse is posessed by a snake spirit. In the meantime, a local woman has been found dead in a mysterious manner. I like the Kenya 1899 setting and the author provides a brief fact or fiction section after the story. Bee and her family don't fit in, but they are doing their best. Bee tries to keep an open mind when dealing with people, but she is a part of her British culture. Bee also learns a few things about her past that puts her prejudices in a different light. It's a cute series. It's light and enjoyable. And Bee is fun to hang out with. ...
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Ghosts of Tsavo by Vered Ehsani

Ghosts of Tsavo by Vered Ehsani

Ghosts of Tsavo is not my typical read, but it is. It's kind of like a cozy mystery set in Victorian-era Kenya, except instead of a traditional mystery, our heroine, Beatrice Knight, "Bee" to her friends, needs to solve a paranormal problem. There are ghost lions killing goats and the railroad workers worry that soon the lions' appetites will turn toward people. Bee, of course, is not alone. She has a family who are totally over-whelmed by moving to Africa, their servant, the local man she semi-partners with who is as mysterious as the lions, and a new friend who seems a bit ditzy. Oh, and her dead husband who is haunting her. And a local man that is interested in the lions for another reason altogether. It's a fun story and I enjoyed the historical Kenya setting. I like Bee. She's intelligent, but also likes people to observe the customs of the era when possible. Politeness and tea are important. She's...
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Binding Dante Lovelace by Jennifer Rainey

Binding Dante Lovelace by Jennifer Rainey

My two favorite demons, Dante Lovelace and Iago Wick, are in trouble again. Definitely go back and read The Last Temptations of Iago Wick, the first in the series, before Binding Dante Lovelace though. It gives some extra background to the characters that I think it's better when reading this one. The first gives more attention to their jobs as demons, while this one's focus is a bit different. Dante has been bound by a witch, which Hell lets occur. They don't really have their demons' backs when it comes down to it. The witch needs his power to add to hers, but we don't find out why for a few chapters. Turns out the world is actually in danger and Dante has been forced to help save it. Of course, Iago leaves Boston to join him. Of course, saving the world is never easy, especially not for demons. The costs are high. I adore Dante and Iago. I love how...
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The Janus Affair by Pip Ballantine and Tee Morris

First off, The Janus Affair overall was better than the first in the series for me. I liked the suffragette connection and I thought the gadgets and machines were cooler this time around. It's a funner book. Braun and Books are a great team. I enjoy their interactions. They are both witty and have wonderful comebacks and one-liners. They make me smile. There's some sexual tension, but the romance touches don't overpower the story. However, the introduction of Eliza's old flame leads to one of my quibbles. While his presence pushed Books to look a little more at his feelings for Eliza, I could have done without him. I almost quit partway through. There were two male secondary characters, one being Eliza's old friend and the other a fellow Ministry worker, who I just didn't enjoy. They were jerks, and not integral enough to the story to make up for the amount of time spent on them. I really just strongly disliked...
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Phoenix Rising by Pip Ballantine and Tee Morris

Phoenix Rising was fun, but not quite good enough to hold my attention the whole time - like I found myself at the gym watching the captions on HGTV instead of listening to the story. I think it's a problem with the attitude of the book. It's steampunk. Books is an archivist; Braun is kind of a female James Bond. They embark on solving a mystery that drove one of their colleagues literally insane. There are huge mechamen and an enemy intent on destroying England maybe - not sure. There's an orgy and an escape from the dungeon. It's absurd and would be amusing, if it felt like the story knew how silly it was, instead it seems to take itself seriously. Now, I listened to the audio, so I don't know if that's just the way the narration seemed and I would have found the whole think more tongue in cheek had I been reading it in print. I like...
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