Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Tell us about your new arrivals by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky at mailboxmonday.wordpress.com.

I received one for review from the publisher. My comments—and a giveaway—will be up tomorrow.

Mailbox Monday – 2/11Hibernate with Me by Benjamin Scheuer
Narrator: Jeffrey Kafer
Illustrator: Jemima Williams
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on February 12, 2019
Source: Publisher
Genres: Picture Book
Pages: 40
Format: Hardcover
Buy on Amazon
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Hibernate with Me is a gentle reminder that no matter how sad, small, or scared you feel, you are always worthy of love, and that brighter days are always ahead.

Sometimes you feel small. Sometimes you feel shy.
Sometimes you feel worried, and you might not know why.

Sometimes you want nobody to see.
Darling, you can hibernate with me.

If you feel scared or lost, or even just a little shy, love means there will always be a place to hibernate together.

A place that’s cozy, warm, and safe.

Audible was having a 2-for-1 sale, so I picked up these two. I reviewed the first the other day.

Mailbox Monday – 2/11Voice of the Violin by Andrea Camilleri
Translator: Stephen Sartarelli
Narrator: Grove Gardner
Published by Blackstone Audiobooks on May 1, 2008 (first published 1997)
Source: Purchased
Genres: Mystery
Length: 5 hrs 17 mins
Buy on Amazon or Audible
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Inspector Montalbano's gruesome discovery of the body of a lovely, naked young woman suffocated in her bed immediately sets him on a search for her killer. Among the suspects are her aging husband, a famous doctor; a shy admirer, now disappeared; an antiques-dealing lover from Bologna; and the victim's friend Anna, whose charms Montalbano cannot help but appreciate. But it is a reclusive violinist who holds the key to the murder. Montalbano does not disappoint, bringing his compelling mix of humor, cynicism, compassion, and love of good food to solve another riveting mystery.

Mailbox Monday – 2/11The World Beneath by Rebecca Cantrell
Narrator: Jeffrey Kafer
Series: Joe Tesla #1
Published by the author on January 28, 2014
Source: Purchased
Genres: Thriller
Length: 7 hrs 12 mins
Format: Audiobook
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Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author Rebecca Cantrell drops you into a vast, dark world: 100 miles of living, breathing, tunnels that is the New York City underground. This subterranean labyrinth inhales three million bustling commuters every day. And every day, it breathes them all out again... except for one.

Software millionaire Joe Tesla is set to ring the bell on Wall Street the morning his company goes public. On what should be the brightest day in his life, he is instead struck with severe agoraphobia. The sudden dread of the outside is so debilitating, he can't leave his hotel at Grand Central Terminal, except to go underground. Bad luck for Joe, because in the tunnels lurk corpses and murderers, an underground Victorian mansion and a mysterious bricked-up 1940s presidential train car. Joe and his service dog, Edison, find themselves pursued by villains and police alike, their only salvation now is to unearth the mystery that started it all, a deadly, contagious madness on the brink of escaping The World Beneath.

And I picked out my two Amazon First Reads for the month. None really grabbed my attention, but these are the two I’ll be most likely to read.

Mailbox Monday – 2/11It's Not Hansel and Gretel by Josh Funk
Illustrator: Edwardian Taylor
Series: It's Not a Fairy Tale #2
Published by Two Lions on March 1, 2019
Source: Amazon First Reads
Genres: Picture Book
Pages: 40
Format: eBook
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Hansel and Gretel will not listen to their storyteller. For one thing, who leaves a trail of bread crumbs lying around, when there are people starving? Not Hansel, that’s for sure! And that sweet old lady who lives in a house made of cookies and candy? There’s no way she’s an evil witch! As for Gretel, well, she’s about to set the record straight—after all, who says the story can’t be called Gretel and Hansel? It’s time for these wacky siblings to take their fairy tale into their own hands. So sit back and enjoy the gingerbread!

With laugh-out-loud dialogue and bold, playful art (including hidden search-and-find fairy-tale creatures), this Hansel and Gretel retelling will have kids giggling right up to the delicious ending!

Mailbox Monday – 2/11Where the Forest Meets the Stars by Glendy Vanderah
Published by Lake Union Publishing on March 1, 2019
Source: Amazon First Reads
Genres: Fiction
Pages: 304
Format: eBook
Buy on Amazon or Audible
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After the loss of her mother and her own battle with breast cancer, Joanna Teale returns to her graduate research on nesting birds in rural Illinois, determined to prove that her recent hardships have not broken her. She throws herself into her work from dusk to dawn, until her solitary routine is disrupted by the appearance of a mysterious child who shows up at her cabin barefoot and covered in bruises.

The girl calls herself Ursa, and she claims to have been sent from the stars to witness five miracles. With concerns about the child’s home situation, Jo reluctantly agrees to let her stay—just until she learns more about Ursa’s past.

Jo enlists the help of her reclusive neighbor, Gabriel Nash, to solve the mystery of the charming child. But the more time they spend together, the more questions they have. How does a young girl not only read but understand Shakespeare? Why do good things keep happening in her presence? And why aren’t Jo and Gabe checking the missing children’s website anymore?

Though the three have formed an incredible bond, they know difficult choices must be made. As the summer nears an end and Ursa gets closer to her fifth miracle, her dangerous past closes in. When it finally catches up to them, all of their painful secrets will be forced into the open, and their fates will be left to the stars.

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