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Mailbox Monday – 11/13

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Mailbox Monday

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Tell us about your new arrivals by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky at mailboxmonday.wordpress.com.

I picked up a couple from NetGalley. They were both too tempting.

Mailbox Monday – 11/13The Last Cruise by Kate Christensen
Illustrator: Russell Ayto
Published by Doubleday on July 10, 2018
Source: NetGalley
Genres: Fiction
Pages: 304
Format: eARC
Buy on Amazon
Add on Goodreads

From the acclaimed PEN-Faulkner Award-winning author of The Great Man comes a riveting high-seas adventure that combines Christensen’s signature wit, irony, and humanity to create a striking and unforgettable vision of our times.

The 1950s vintage ocean liner Queen Isabella is making her final voyage before heading to the scrapyard. For the guests on board, among them Christine Thorne, a former journalist turned Maine farmer, it’s a chance to experience the bygone mid-20th century era of decadent luxury cruising, complete with fine dining, classic highballs, string quartets, and sophisticated jazz. Smoking is allowed but not cell phones–or children, for that matter. The Isabella sets sail from Long Beach, CA into calm seas on a two-week retro cruise to Hawaii and back.

But this is the second decade of an uncertain new millennium, not the sunny, heedless fifties, and certain disquieting signs of strife and malfunction above and below decks intrude on the festivities. Down in the main galley, Mick Szabo, a battle-weary Hungarian executive sous-chef, watches escalating tensions among the crew. Meanwhile, Miriam Koslow, an elderly Israeli violinist with the Sabra Quartet, becomes increasingly aware of the age-related vulnerabilities of the ship herself and the cynical corners cut by the cruise ship company, Cabaret.

When a time of crisis begins, Christine, Mick, and Miriam find themselves facing the unknown together in an unexpected and startling test of their characters.

Mailbox Monday – 11/13Old Misery by James Sage
Illustrator: Russell Ayto
Published by Kids Can Press on May 1, 2018
Source: NetGalley
Genres: Picture Book
Pages: 40
Format: eARC
Buy on Amazon
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Poor Old Misery. She and her old cat, Rutterkin, "ain't got two pennies to rub together." And the one thing of value she does have ---a tree, filled with good eating apples --- is regularly ransacked by humans and animals of all kinds who make off with armloads of apples! So, one day, when a surprise visitor grants her a wish, Old Misery tells him, "There's but one wish for me, mister, and it's this here: whoever I catch stealing apples off my tree will get stuck to it until I decide to let them go!" At first, it seems like her wish was a terrific idea, as she catches all the apple thieves and sends them on their way for good. But then Old Misery decides to use her new power on another surprise visitor. And she learns what may be the most miserable lesson of all: be careful what you wish for!

Author James Sage has created a playful allegory about why misery exists in the world, and always will. Award-winning Russell Ayto's two-color, pen-and-ink illustrations do a superb job of evoking the eccentric and slightly macabre feel of the book, perfectly complementing the original voice of the storytelling. The dark humor and a vintage feel will make this picture book a hit with fans of Edward Gorey and Lemony Snicket.

Rapunzel was free when I picked it up, but it’s $2.99 now. I read her re-telling of Beauty and the Beast earlier this year and was surprised by how much I enjoyed it.

Mailbox Monday – 11/13Rapunzel and the Dark Prince by Lidiya Foxglove
Series: Fairy Tale Heat #3
Published by the author on July 3, 2017
Source: Freebie
Genres: Fairy tale, Fantasy, Romance
Pages: 159
Format: eBook
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It gets pretty lonely, spending your entire life in a tower. The Witch told me she was keeping me safe from a dangerous world. But one day, when I let down my hair, the Witch wasn't the one to climb up.

His presence was so overwhelming; his hands steady on my back, his lips and tongue marking me forever with the taste of a man. I was used to being alone a lot of the time, and wandering around the tower sort of aimlessly, trying to decide what to do once the chores were done.

Now his mouth was telling me what to do and oh, it was good. I would say it was a relief, but it was a lot more than that.

Prince Dorin of Yirvagna, from the darkling lands, is tall and dark, with horns and a tail...and the first man I've ever seen in my life. He tells me I'm his bonded mate and I must come with him, and if I'm not so sure about this (admittedly charming) prince, the Witch's plans for me are worse. And when Prince Dorin stands in her way, her retaliation is swift. I taste freedom for the first time at the cost of Dorin's eyesight...but can I find a way to lift his curse?

The Fairy Tale Heat series are standalone fairy tale retellings for those who like unabashedly adorable happily ever afters with a side of serious steaminess!

 

On Our Way to Oyster Bay by Monica Kulling

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On Our Way to Oyster Bay by Monica Kulling On Our Way to Oyster Bay: Mother Jones and Her March for Children's Rights by Monica Kulling
Illustrator: Felicita Sala
Published by Kids Can Press on September 6, 2016
Source: NetGalley
Genres: Picture Book, History
Pages: 32
Format: eARC
Buy on Amazon
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Though eight-year-old Aidan and his friend Gussie want to go to school, like many other children in 1903, they work twelve hours, six days a week, at a cotton mill in Pennsylvania instead. So when the millworkers decide to go on strike, the two friends join the picket line. Maybe now life will change for them. But when a famous labor reformer named Mother Jones comes to hear of the millworkers' demands, she tells them they need to do more than just strike. Troubled by all she had seen, Mother Jones wanted to end child labor. But what could she do? Why, organize a children's march and bring the message right to President Theodore Roosevelt at his summer home in Oyster Bay, of course!

Good points:

Excellent introduction to Mother Jones and her cause. To be honest, I had never heard of her before and found her fascinating.

Told from a kid’s point of view, allowing children to relate

Takes others’ problems, like child labor, and reminds us that Americans have dealt with the same issues

Very good artwork, detailed and added to the story

Includes factual information for parents/adults at the end

Gives a call to action encouraging children that they can make a difference in the world

Negative points:

I can’t see this one being any kids favorite. It’s good and historical, just not engrossing.

May need some explanations, depending. Some kids may not be familiar with the sewing machinery terms, some may not even be familiar with what a strike is.

It’s disappointing that the kids don’t actually get to meet President Roosevelt.

Overall:

A good one to borrow from the library.

A must-buy for an elementary school classroom library.

 

About Monica Kulling

Monica Kulling was born in Vancouver, British Columbia. She received a BA in creative writing from the University of Victoria. Monica Kulling has published twenty-six fiction and nonfiction books for children, including picture books, poetry, and biographies. She is best known for introducing biography to children just learning to read and has written about Harriet Tubman, Houdini, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Amelia Earhart among others. Monica Kulling lives in Toronto, Canada.

Mailbox Monday – 10/17

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Mailbox Monday

Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists.

Tell us about your new arrivals by adding your Mailbox Monday post to the linky at mailboxmonday.wordpress.com.

Ebooks

I picked up one from NetGalley this week.

Mailbox Monday – 10/17On Our Way to Oyster Bay: Mother Jones and Her March for Children's Rights by Monica Kulling
Illustrator: Felicita Sala
Published by Kids Can Press on September 6, 2016
Genres: Childrens, History
Pages: 32
Format: eARC
Buy on Amazon
Add on Goodreads

Though eight-year-old Aidan and his friend Gussie want to go to school, like many other children in 1903, they work twelve hours, six days a week, at a cotton mill in Pennsylvania instead. So when the millworkers decide to go on strike, the two friends join the picket line. Maybe now life will change for them. But when a famous labor reformer named Mother Jones comes to hear of the millworkers' demands, she tells them they need to do more than just strike. Troubled by all she had seen, Mother Jones wanted to end child labor. But what could she do? Why, organize a children's march and bring the message right to President Theodore Roosevelt at his summer home in Oyster Bay, of course!

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