The Bell in the Fog by Lev A.C. Rosen

The Bell in the Fog by Lev A.C. Rosen

The Bell in the Fog is the second in the Andy Mills series and I do think it's best to read Lavender House first. It gives a good introduction to Andy and his world, along with a couple of characters who reappear here. Andy is set up as a private detective now, but because he used to be a cop the community doesn't trust him, so he's not getting much business. He lives above Elsie's bar, the Ruby, and he's costing it business too, so she's not making enough to pay the bribes that prevent raids. He needs the money, so when someone from his past wants to hire him to find out who is behind blackmail photos that could threaten his military career, Andy takes the case. The mystery itself is of course more complicated than it seems at first, and more dangerous. It's also so connected to Andy's past that maybe he's not seeing things as clearly as he should....
Read More
A Murder to Remember by Brynn Kelly

A Murder to Remember by Brynn Kelly

I have to admit, A Murder to Remember was a bit silly and predictable, but I enjoyed it. It's a fun cross between rom com and murder mystery with a bunch of Austen references. Amelia goes on a tour to England to clear her mind and enjoy all the Austen related tourist stops. She skips out of the official tour at a rather worse for wear manor house and while she's exploring on her own, she meets Tom, the current heir. Tom invites her to join him in drinking his way through the wine cellar and they have a fun evening together. But when morning comes around they have vague memories of having witnessed a murder. Amelia and Tom are good characters. They've each been through a lot and it's affected how they look at the world. The audiobook has alternating narrators for their two points of view and it works well. The mystery itself was fine. It turns out Amelia...
Read More
Agatha Christie’s Poirot by Mark Aldridge

Agatha Christie’s Poirot by Mark Aldridge

I loved this book. But I adore Poirot and I do think you need to be a fan to want to read it. The book is broken down in decades, from Poirot's first appearance in 1920 in The Mysterious Affair at Styles through Kenneth Branagh's movies. Aldridge discusses the books, plays, films, television & radio stories in a straightforward way that can be a little dry at times. He summarizes each story, but but without giving away any spoilers. He includes excerpts from Christie’s journals and correspondence, and talks about the interactions between Christie and her publishers, which weren't always positive. He also shares reviews from newspapers regarding the stories. There are a lot of illustrations, including book covers, movie posters, and photos of actors, but all in black and white. For me, this was an absolutely fun book. It's thorough and well-researched and was a joy to read. ...
Read More
A Canadian Werewolf in New York by Mark Leslie

A Canadian Werewolf in New York by Mark Leslie

A Canadian Werewolf in New York is a fun book. Michael Andrews is a best-selling author living in New York who is also a werewolf. He's just back from a night roaming the city as a wolf when his ex-girlfriend shows up at his apartment, asking him to help find out what her fiancé is involved in. Michael has heightened smell and strength, thanks to his wolf half, which is helpful when it comes to tracking down the fiancé and the bad guys he's dealing with. This is a light book - some adventure, some humor, some bad guys, a potential love interest that knows he's a werewolf and is okay with that. I was looking for a werewolf book that wasn't a romance or horror and maybe had a bit of a mystery. This was a perfect pick. ...
Read More
The Antique Hunter’s Guide to Murder by C.L. Miller

The Antique Hunter’s Guide to Murder by C.L. Miller

I'll admit, the whole Agatha Christie/ Antiques Roadshow/ Indiana Jones vibe is what drew me to The Antique Hunter's Guide to Murder. When Freya learns that Arthur Crockleford, her aunt's best friend and her own mentor, is dead, Freya Lockwood heads back to her hometown. When she gets there, she and Aunt Carole become suspicious of the events surrounding Arthur's death and become convinced they can find answers at an antique retreat Arthur arranged for them to attend before his death. I wanted to like Freya. She's middle-aged, and recently divorced from her negative, controlling, husband. Decades ago, she had been an antiques hunter, repatriating stolen antiques and antiquities, but she left that world due to "what happened in Cairo," which she dwells on a lot. Now that she's single and her daughter is studying in America, maybe it's time for her to rediscover herself. I enjoy her when she's tough and uses her skill and knowledge, but she spends...
Read More
Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem

Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem

Motherless Brooklyn is at heart a take on the classic detective story, but with an unlikely hero in Lionel Essrog who has Tourette's syndrome. I listened to the audio on this one and I have to believe that hearing the verbal tics and outbursts worked better than reading them in print would have. Lionel was rescued as a teenager from the orphanage by a small-time crook, Frank Minna, who hired Lionel and three other boys to do odd jobs and staff a questionable car service/detective agency. When Minna is stabbed to death, Lionel decides it's up to him to find the murderer. The plot is put together well, with some of the usual suspects - two old time Mafia men, a hired goon, a potentially evil Japanese corporation, and the dead man's wife, but there are a few interesting twists too. The star, though, is really Lionel. He's funny, both intentionally and unintentionally, and trying to follow the clues the...
Read More